Symptoms of Schizoid and Schizotypal Personality Disorders

Schizoid and Schizotypal  pic

Schizoid and Schizotypal
Image: disorders.org

As a psychiatrist at the Wyandot Center in Kansas City, Kansas, Christie Mensch offers evaluation and treatment for a wide variety of mental health challenges. Christie Mensch draws on experience in addressing personality disorders, including schizotypal and schizoid disorders.

Schizotypal and schizoid personality disorders both fall into what the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5), calls Cluster A, which features eccentric or unusual behaviors that persist throughout the adult lifespan. Both lead to difficulty building and maintaining relationships, though schizoid personality disorder is more closely linked to emotional detachment.

Individuals with schizoid personality disorder show little interest in having close friends or intimate partners, and they tend to struggle with perceiving and interpreting social cues. In addition, because these individuals present with minimal emotional expression and have trouble showing pleasure or joy, they often appear cold and unfeeling to others.

Those with schizotypal personality disorder tend to spend a great deal of time alone, though this is more likely to stem from an intense and unrelenting social anxiety. A person with this condition may also experience isolation due to speech patterns, emotional responses, and beliefs that differ noticeably from societal norms. Superstitions are common among individuals with this condition, as is a tendency to disproportionately relate outside events back to the self.

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Signs of Anxiety

 

Signs of Anxiety pic

Signs of Anxiety
Image: webmd.com

Dr. Christie Mensch furnishes psychiatric care at Wyandot Center in Kansas City, Kansas. Anxiety is one among many mental health conditions treated by Dr. Christie Mensch.

Patients with anxiety disorders experience an abnormal amount of worry over months or years. Sometimes, these patients’ anxiety not only fails to dissipate, but even gets worse with time. Physicians organize anxiety into several types, including “generalized anxiety disorder” (GAD) and “panic disorder” (PD).

GAD encompasses such symptoms as restlessness, irritability, feelings of muscle tension, worrying that seems out of control, and problems concentrating. PD, on the other hand, is characterized largely by an event called a “panic attack.”

Panic attacks can occur suddenly and give rise to alarming physical symptoms like shortness of breath and heart palpitations. Patients who have experienced panic attacks may be burdened by fear that they’ll happen again to the extent that they avoid locations where they’ve had such attacks in the past.

In the United States, experts estimate that 40 million patients live with anxiety disorders. Of those, about 13 million get the help they need. Anxiety is a treatable illness, and patients with anxiety symptoms can consult their physician about avenues for care.

Characteristics of Dependent Personality Disorder

 

Dependent Personality Disorder pic

Dependent Personality Disorder
Image: webmd.com

Dr. Christie Mensch serves as a psychiatrist at the Wyandot Center in Kansas City, Kansas. At the mental health center, Dr. Christie Mensch draws on experience treating patients with personality disorders.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5), describes a personality disorder as a pervasive maladaptive pattern of relating that affects the way an individual perceives and interacts with others, the environment, and the self on a consistent basis across the adult lifespan. To be diagnosed with a personality disorder, the person’s experience must significantly deviate from cultural norms and must affect at least two of a group of areas that include cognition, affect regulation, social functioning, and control of impulses.

Dependent personality disorder includes conditions characterized by anxiety and fear. Persons with dependent personality disorder fear to be alone and feel incapable of caring for themselves.

Such individuals depend on others, or a single significant other, to make most major and minor decisions ranging from everyday wardrobe selections to career paths. Because people with dependent personality disorder feel so dependent on others, they avoid conflict and seek to ingratiate themselves with others.

This need to be controlled goes beyond what is typical for the person’s age and developmental stage. Adults may continue to depend on parents or seek out new relationships as soon as old relationships end so they do not have to face their fear of functioning independently in society.